Max Krebs

SCOTT HANSELMAN: Ruby on Rails on Azure App Service (Web Sites) with Linux (and Ubuntu on Windows 10)

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This is a great post from Scott. I’ve only recently become familiar with his writing and excellent podcast Hanselminutes but he does great work. The Linux subsystem for Windows was the start of my process of actually looking at Windows as a suitable operating system to do software development on, and if getting a Rails environment set up on windows is as easy as Scott makes it look, then I am sold.

Is the iPad a Professional Machine?

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This is sort of a follow up to a post I wrote last month. I had this thought at like five in the morning as my cat was waking me up for breakfast. There has been a lot of strife in the Apple tech community about iPads and Macs and what “professional work” is and what the future of computing looks like. My opinion on this probably means very little. I’ve been an Apple fan for years, but I’ve been a planning on moving to Windows/Linux and Android recently.

Oh Bootstrap, I'll Never Leave You Again

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Oh Bootstrap, I’ll Never Leave You Again I am not a designer. I don’t like designing front-ends for websites. It’s tedious and I am not good at it so I mostly just spend hours moving CSS values up and down in Chrome Dev Tools until it looks right to me. Oh wait, I have to also got through the same process again for each responsive breakpoint. No thanks. Which is ironic, because I started at my job-y job as a front-end intern.

Deploying Rails to a Linux VPS

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This is part three in my series on hosting a Rails application on a Linux Virtual Private Server. You can read part one here and part two here. It’s About Time Finally we are going to talk about what you actually do once you have a fancy new Linux server up and running. We are going to put our website on the Internet! The stack that I use is Nginx with a Puma proxy for the web server, Postgres for the database, and rbenv to manage the Ruby version both on my local machine and on the server (RVM people, don’t email me).

A Sidebar to Gloat

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On February 28th, 2017, in a perfect representation of how this year is going, Amazon’s AWS S3 service fell over. Amazon described it as ‘Increased Error Rates’, although to me, that seemed to be understating the situation a bit. S3 is Amazon’s cloud storage solution that most of the Internet uses to serve files and assets like images or PDFs. What happened was that some issue caused connections to S3’s US-east region to be incapable of sending or receiving connections.

Setting up a VPS on Heroku

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This is Part Two in my series of posts on moving from Heroku to Linode for web application hosting. You can read part one here. Front Matter The most intimidating part of setting up a self-managed hosting solution, for me, was figuring out exactly how to configure my server at an OS level. I am not a sys-admin (or at least I am not one full-time) and so it was scary thinking about managing a machine all from the command line.

Moving from Heroku to Linode

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part one Heroku is pretty great service. It takes all of the complexity of web infrastructure and reduces it down to a pretty simple interface. Deploying your app is as simple as pushing to a git repository and you don’t have to worry about provisioning users or databases or anything to do with the actual server. I am a firm believer that Heroku is a great choice for many people and that everyone from beginners to large companies can, and should use Heroku for their hosting.

iOS is the new Linux

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Steve Jobs described the iPad as “The Future of Computing” when he introduced it in 2010. When it first launched, the speed at which sales were growing was outpacing even the iPhone. In the last few year; however, quarterly sales for iPads just keeps falling. Apple posted some record breaking sales figures this quarter, but the iPad continued its downward trend, losing 22% since the last year. The iPhone for comparison, was up around 55 year over year.

Rails <3 Yarn

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Declaring My Biases I don’t like JavaScript. Not very much anyway. Technically, it was the first real programming language that I learned (if you don’t count HTML as a programming language, which is both arguable and for another time) way back three or four years ago when I did some Code Academy front-end tutorials. I’ve written whole hybrid mobile applications in JavaScript. I had an entire course in University taught in Angular.

REST APIs with Salesforce

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This is going to be diverting a little bit from the normal area of programming that I cover. At my joby-job, we do most of our work in developing on the Salesforce platform. Normally, Salesforce is used for really boring CRM and marketing, but our clients come to us with problems and we solve them. Tangentially, I’ve been thinking a lot about my relationship with Salesforce as a platform, and I think that there are some ways that the incredible restrictions Salesforce places on its developers has been making me better at writing good software, but more on that soon I think.